Showing posts with label Wuhan. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Wuhan. Show all posts

Sunday, March 22, 2020

China Threatens Throwing U.S. 'Into the Mighty Sea of the Coronavirus.'

China Threatens Throwing U.S. 'Into the Mighty Sea of the Coronavirus.'




China Threatens Throwing U.S. 'Into the Mighty Sea of the Coronavirus.'; and  wreak havoc on America’s drug supply amid the Wuhan coronavirus outbreak. 

Thanks to our internationalist elite and especially missteps during the Obama-Biden administration, Beijing has the power to do just that.

China Threatens Throwing U.S. 'Into the Mighty Sea of the Coronavirus.'; In an article in Xinhua, one of the Chinese Communist Party’s mouthpieces, Beijing threatened that it can impose pharmaceutical export controls after which America will be “plunged into the mighty sea of coronavirus.”

As Rosemary Gibson, co-author of “China Rx: Exposing the Risks of America’s Dependence on China for Medicine,” testified to a congressional commission last summer, China has a dominant role in the manufacture of the generic drugs that comprise 90 percent of what Americans take.



China Threat, U.S. Counters is Racist.
a. Marines Plan to Retool to Meet China Threat 
b. Coronavirus Drives the U.S. and China Deeper Into Global Power Struggle  
c. China, ‘most serious U.S. threat’, X-Security Advisor To Obama



Wednesday, March 4, 2020

CoronaVirus_COVID-19_SARS-CoVid-2




CoronaVirus_COVID-19_SARS-CoVid-2


Life Before Novel Coronavirus in Wuhan China,
Coronavirus Update and Positive News 2020


About CoronaVirus_COVID-19_SARS-CoVid-2; This video shares some positive memories about the situation before the Novel Coronavirus outbreak.

Novel Coronavirus outbreak in China has completely changed life in Wuhan China, People are all wondering about the coronavirus symptoms and keep looking for the coronavirus updates and new.






Percentage Calculator


Situation Summary; The, COVID-19; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is closely monitoring an outbreak of respiratory illness caused by a novel (new) coronavirus first identified in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China.
Chinese authorities identified the new coronavirus, which has resulted in thousands of confirmed cases in China, including cases outside Wuhan City.
Additional cases have been identified in a growing number of other international locations, including the United States.
There are ongoing investigations to learn more. How COVID-19 Spreads<br Much is unknown about how COVID-19, a new coronavirus, spreads.
Current knowledge is largely based on what is known about similar coronaviruses.
Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that are common in many different species of animals, including camels, cattle, cats, and bats.
Rarely, animal coronaviruses can infect people and then spread between people such as with; MERS, SARS, and now with COVID-19.

Most often, spread from person-to-person happens among close contacts (about 6 feet).

Person-to-person spread is thought to occur mainly via respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes, similar to how influenza and other respiratory pathogens spread.

These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.

It’s currently unclear if a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes.

Typically, with most respiratory viruses, people are thought to be most contagious when they are most symptomatic (the sickest). With COVID-19, however, there have been reports external icons of spread from an infected patient with no symptoms to close contact.

It’s important to note that how easily a virus spreads person-to-person can vary. Some viruses are highly contagious (like measles), while other viruses are less so.

There is much more to learn about the transmissibility, severity, and other features associated with COVID-19 and, investigations are ongoing.

This information will further inform the risk assessment. Read the latest 2019 Novel Coronavirus, Wuhan, China situation summary.

Prevention and Treatment
Simplified Chinese Translation

Prevention: 
There is currently no vaccine to prevent COVID-19 infection.
The best way to prevent infection is to avoid being exposed to this virus.
However, as a reminder, the CDC always recommends everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory viruses, and including:
Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol if soap and water are not available.
Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
Stay home when you are sick.
Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.


These are everyday habits that can help prevent the spread of several viruses. CDC does have specific guidance for travelers.

Treatment:
There is no specific antiviral treatment recommended for COVID-19 infection. People infected with COVID-19 should receive supportive care to help relieve symptoms. For severe cases, treatment should include care to support vital organ functions.


People who think they may have been exposed to COVID-19 should contact your healthcare provider immediately.

See Interim Guidance for Healthcare Professionals for information on patients under investigation.

What to do if you are sick with 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Recently Returned Travelers from China:

If you were in China in the last 14 days and feel sick with fever, cough and...

difficulty breathing, you should:
Seek medical care right away. Before you go to a doctor’s office or emergency room, call ahead and tell them about your recent travel and your symptoms.
Avoid contact with others.

Not travel while sick. Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.

Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds to avoid spreading the virus to others. Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol if soap and water are not available.

Printer-friendly version pdf icon

Steps to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 if you are sick

If you are sick with COVID-19 follow the steps below to help prevent COVID-19 from spreading to people in your home and community.
Stay home except to get medical care:

You should not leave your home, except to get medical care. Do not go to work, school, or public areas, and do not use public transportation or taxis.

Separate yourself from other people in your home: 
As much as possible, you should stay in a different room from other people in your home. Also, you should use a separate bathroom, if available.

Caregivers and Household Members

Information for caregivers of a person confirmed to have or being evaluated for, COVID-19 infection.

Close Contacts

Information for close contacts of a person confirmed to have or being evaluated for, COVID-19 infection.


Call ahead before visiting your doctor: 
Before your medical appointment, call the healthcare provider and tell them that you have, or are being evaluated for, COVID-19 infection. This will help the healthcare provider’s office take steps to keep other people from getting infected.

Wear a facemask: 
You should wear a facemask when you are in the same room with other people and when you visit a healthcare provider. If you cannot wear a facemask, the people who live with you should wear one while they are in the same room as you.

Cover your coughs and sneezes: 
Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, or you can cough or sneeze into your sleeve. Throw used tissues in a lined trash can, and immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.

Wash your hands: 
Wash your hands often and thoroughly with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.  You can use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.  Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

Avoid sharing household items:
You should not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels, bedding, or other items with other people in your home.
After using these items, you should wash them thoroughly with soap and water.

Monitor your symptoms:
Get medical care quickly if your illness is getting worse (for example if you are having trouble breathing).
Call the healthcare provider ahead of time and tell them that you have, or are being evaluated for, COVID-19 infection. This will help the healthcare provider’s office take steps to keep other people from getting infected.

Avoid contact with pets and other animals:
Do not handle pets or other animals while sick.
Although there have not been reports of pets or other animals becoming sick with COVID-19, several types of coronaviruses can cause illness in animals and spread between animals and people.
Until we know more, avoid contact with animals and wear a facemask if you must be around animals or care for a pet.

Frequently Asked Questions and Answers...

On This Pag:
Disease Basics
Prevention
Medical Information
Public Health Response and Current Situation
Travel
COVID-19 and Animals

Disease Basics:

Q: What is the 2019 Novel Coronavirus?

A: The 2019 Novel Coronavirus, or COVID-19, is a new respiratory virus first identified in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. Learn about 2019 Novel Coronavirus.


Q: What is a novel coronavirus?

A: A novel coronavirus (nCoV) is a new coronavirus that has not been previously identified. The 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), is not that same as the coronaviruses that commonly circulate among humans and cause mild illness, like the common cold. A diagnosis with coronavirus 229E, NL63, OC43, or HKU1 is not the same as a COVID-19 diagnosis. These are different viruses and patients with COVID-19 will be evaluated and cared for differently than patients with common coronavirus diagnoses.


Q: What is the source of COVID-19?

A: Public health officials and partners are working hard to identify the source of the COVID-19. Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses, some causing illness in people and others that circulate among animals, including camels, cats, and bats. Analysis of the genetic tree of this virus is ongoing to know the specific source of the virus. SARS, another coronavirus that emerged to infect people, came from civet cats, while MERS, another coronavirus that emerged to infect people, came from camels. More information about the source and spread of COVID-19 is available on the COVID-19 Situation Summary: Source and Spread of the Virus.


Q: How does the virus spread?

A: This virus probably originally emerged from an animal source but now seems to be spreading from person-to-person. It’s important to note that person-to-person spread can happen on a continuum. Some viruses are highly contagious (like measles), while other viruses are less so. At this time, it’s unclear how easily or sustainably this virus is spreading between people. Learn what is known about the spread of newly emerged coronaviruses.


Q: Is COVID-19 the same as the MERS-CoV or SARS virus?

A: No. Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses, some causing illness in people and others that circulate among animals, including camels, cats, and bats. The recently emerged COVID-19 is not the same as the coronavirus that causes Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) or the coronavirus that causes Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). However, genetic analyses suggest this virus emerged from a virus related to SARS. There are ongoing investigations to learn more. This is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.
Prevention:

Q: How can I help protect myself?

A: Visit the COVID-19 Prevention and Treatment page to learn about how to protect yourself from respiratory illnesses, like COVID-19.


Q: What should I do if I had close contact with someone who has COVID-19?

A: There is information for people who have had close contact with a person confirmed to have, or being evaluated for, COVID-19 infection available online.

Q: Does CDC recommend the use of facemask in the community to prevent COVID-19?

A: No. CDC does not currently recommend the use of face masks among the general public. While limited person-to-person spread among close contacts has been detected, this virus is not currently spreading in the community in the United States.


Top of Page
Medical Information:
Q: What are the symptoms and complications that COVID-19 can cause?

A: Current symptoms reported for patients with COVID-19 have included mild to severe respiratory illness with fever1, cough, and difficulty breathing. Read about COVID-19 Symptoms.

Q: Should I be tested for COVID-19?

A: If you develop a fever1 and symptoms of respiratory illness, such as cough or shortness of breath, within 14 days after travel from China, you should call ahead to a healthcare professional and mention your recent travel or close contact. If you have had close contact2 with someone showing these symptoms who have recently traveled from this area, you should call ahead to a healthcare professional and mention your close contact and their recent travel. Your healthcare professional will work with your state’s public health department and CDC to determine if you need to be tested for COVID-19.


Q: How do you test a person for COVID-19?

A: At this time, diagnostic testing for COVID-19 can be conducted only at CDC.

State and local health departments who have identified a person under investigation (PUI) should immediately notify CDC’s Emergency Operations Center (EOC) to report the PUI and determine whether testing for COVID-19 at CDC is indicated. The EOC will assist local/state health departments to collect, store, and ship specimens appropriately to CDC, including during after-hours or on weekends/holidays.


For more information on specimen collection see CDC Information for Laboratories.

Q: What should healthcare professionals and health departments do?

A: For recommendations and guidance on patients under investigation; infection control, including personal protective equipment guidance; home care and isolation; and case investigation, see Information for Healthcare Professionals. For information on specimen collection and shipment, see Information for Laboratories.
Public Health Response and Current Situation


Q: What is CDC doing about COVID-19?

A: This is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation and CDC will continue to provide updated information as it becomes available. CDC works 24/7 to protect people’s health. It is the CDC’s job to be concerned and move quickly whenever there is a potential public health problem. More information about the CDC’s response to COVID-19 is available online.


Q: Am I at risk for COVID-19 infection in the United States?

A: This is a rapidly evolving situation and the risk assessment may change daily. The latest updates are available on CDC’s 2019 Novel Coronavirus website.


Q: Has anyone in the United States gotten infected?

A: Yes. The first infection with COVID-19 in the United States was reported on January 21, 2020. The first confirmed instance of person-person-spread with this virus in the U.S. was reported on January 30, 2020. See the current U.S. case count of infection with COVID-19.


Q: Am I at risk for novel coronavirus from a package or product shipping from China?
A: There is still a lot that is unknown about the newly emerged 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) and how it spreads. Two other coronaviruses have emerged previously to cause severe illness in people (MERS and SARS). COVID-19 is more genetically related to SARS than MERS, but both are beta coronaviruses with their origins in bats. While we don’t know for sure that this virus will behave the same way as SARS and MERS, we can use the information from both of these earlier coronaviruses to guide us. In general, because of poor survivability of these coronaviruses on surfaces, there is likely a very low risk of spread from products or packaging that are shipped over a period of days or weeks at ambient temperatures. Coronaviruses are generally thought to be spread most often by respiratory droplets. Currently, there is no evidence to support the transmission of COVID-19 associated with imported goods and there have not been any cases of COVID-19 in the United States associated with imported goods. Information will be provided on the 2019 Novel Coronavirus website as it becomes available.


Q: Is it safe to travel to China or other countries where COVID-19 cases have occurred?

A: The situation is evolving. Stay up to date with CDC’s travel health notices related to this outbreak. These notices will be updated as more information becomes available.

Q: What if I recently traveled to China and got sick?

A: If you were in China and feel sick with fever, cough, or difficulty breathing, within 14 days after you left, you should seek medical care right away. Before you go to a doctor’s office or emergency room, call ahead and tell them about your recent travel and your symptoms. Avoid contact with others. Not travel while sick.  Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing. Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds to avoid spreading the virus to others. Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol, if soap and water are not available. CDC does have additional specific guidance for travelers available online. COVID-19 and Animals


Q: What about animals or animal products imported from China?

A: CDC does not have any evidence to suggest that animals or animal products imported from China pose a risk for spreading COVID-19 in the United States. This is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available. The United States Department of Agriculture regulates external icon the importation of animals and animal products and the CDC regulates the importation of animals and animal products capable of spreading human disease.

Q: Should I be concerned about pets or other animals and COVID-19?
A: While this virus seems to have emerged from an animal source, it is now spreading from person-to-person. CDC recommends that people traveling to China avoid animals both alive and dead, but there is no reason to think that any animals or pets in the United States might be a source of infection with this new coronavirus.


Q: Should I avoid contact with pets or other animals if I am sick?
A: Do not handle pets or other animals while sick. Although there have not been reports of pets or other animals becoming sick with COVID-19, several types of coronaviruses can cause illness in animals and spread between animals and people. Until we know more, avoid contact with animals and wear a facemask if you must be around animals or care for a pet.


Top of Page
Footnotes:
1Fever may not be present in some patients, such as those who are very young, elderly, immunosuppressed, or taking certain fever-lowering medications. Clinical judgment should be used to guide the testing of patients in such situations.


2Close contact is defined as—  being within approximately 6 feet (2 meters), or within the room or care area, of a novel coronavirus case for a prolonged period of time while not wearing recommended personal protective equipment or PPE (e.g., gowns, gloves, NIOSH-certified disposable N95 respirator, eye protection); close contact can include caring for, living with, visiting, or sharing a health care waiting for area or room with a novel coronavirus case.– or – having direct contact with infectious secretions of a novel coronavirus case (e.g., being coughed on) while not wearing recommended personal protective equipment.

See CDC’s Interim Healthcare Infection Prevention and Control Recommendations for Patients Under Investigation for 2019 Novel Coronavirus


Data to inform the definition of close contact are limited. Considerations when assessing close contact include the duration of exposure (e.g., longer exposure time likely increases exposure risk) and the clinical symptoms of the person with the novel coronavirus (e.g., coughing likely increases exposure risk as does exposure to a severely ill patient). Special consideration should be given to those exposed in health care settings.


This is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation and CDC will provide updated information as it becomes available, in addition to updated guidance.


Updated February 1, 2020
Background:
CDC is closely monitoring an outbreak of respiratory illness caused by a novel (new) coronavirus (named “COVID-19”) that was first detected in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China and which continues to expand. Chinese health officials have reported thousands of infections with COVID-19 in China, with the virus reportedly spreading from person-to-person in many parts of that country.


Infections with COVID-19, most of them associated with travel from Wuhan, also are being reported in a growing number of international locations, including the United States. The United States reported the first confirmed instance of person-to-person spread with this virus on January 30, 2020.


On January 30, 2020, the International Health Regulations Emergency Committee of the World Health Organization declared the outbreak a “public health emergency of international concern external icon” (PHEIC).


On January 31, 2020, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex M. Azar II declared a public health emergency (PHE) for the United States to aid the nation’s healthcare community in responding to COVID-19. Also on January 31, the President of the United States signed a presidential “Proclamation on Suspension of Entry as Immigrants and Nonimmigrants of Persons who Pose a Risk of Transmitting 2019 Novel Coronavirusexternal icon“.


These measures were announced at a press briefing by members of the President’s Coronavirus Task Forceexternal icon.

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that are common in many different species of animals, including camels, cattle, cats, and bats. Rarely, animal coronaviruses can infect people and then spread between people such as with MERS, SARS, and now with COVID-19.

Source and Spread of the Virus:
Chinese health authorities were the first to post the full genome of the COVID-19 in GenBankexternal icon, the NIH genetic sequence database, and in the Global Initiative on Sharing All Influenza Data (GISAIDexternal icon) portal, an action which has facilitated detection of this virus. CDC is posting the full genome of the COVID-19 viruses detected in U.S. patients to GenBank as sequencing is completed.


COVID-19 is a betacoronavirus, like MERS and SARs, all of which have their origins in bats. The sequences from U.S. patients are similar to the one that China initially posted, suggesting a likely single, recent emergence of this virus from an animal reservoir.

Early on, many of the patients in the outbreak of respiratory illness caused by COVID-19 in Wuhan, China had some link to large seafood and live animal market, suggesting animal-to-person spread. Later, a growing number of patients reportedly did not have exposure to animal markets, indicating person-to-person spread.


Chinese officials report that sustained person-to-person spread in the community is occurring in China. Person-to-person spread has been reported outside China, including in the United States and other countries. In addition, cases asymptomatic spread of the virus has been reported.

Learn what is known about the spread of newly emerged coronaviruses.
The situation in the U.S.:

Imported cases of COVID-19 infection in people have been detected in the U.S. While person-to-person spread among close contacts has been detected with this virus, at this time this virus is NOT currently spreading in the community in the United States.

On This Page
Background
Source and Spread of the Virus
The situation in the U.S.
Illness Severity
Risk Assessment
What to Expect
CDC Response
CDC Recommends
Other Available Resources


COVID-19 in the U.S.




View larger image

Confirmed COVID-19 Cases Globally





View larger image and see a list of locations
Illness Severity:


Both MERS and SARS have been known to cause severe illness in people. The complete clinical picture with regard to COVID-19 is still not fully clear. Reported illnesses have ranged from infected people with little to no symptoms to people being severely ill and dying. Learn more about the symptoms associated with COVID-19. There are ongoing investigations to learn more. This is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.

Risk Assessment:
Outbreaks of novel virus infections among people are always of public health concern. The risk from these outbreaks depends on the characteristics of the virus, including whether and how well it spreads between people, the severity of resulting illness, and the medical or other measures available to control the impact of the virus (for example, vaccine or treatment medications).


This is a very serious public health threat. The fact that this virus has caused severe illness and sustained person-to-person spread in China is concerning, but it’s unclear how the situation in the United States will unfold at this time.

The risk to individuals is dependent on exposure. At this time, some people will have an increased risk of infection, for example, healthcare workers caring for COVID-19 patients and other close contacts.


For the general American public, who are unlikely to be exposed to this virus, the immediate health risk from COVID-19 is considered low. The goal of the ongoing U.S. public health response is to prevent the sustained spread of COVID-19 in this country.
What to Expect: 
More cases are likely to be identified in the coming days, including more cases in the United States. It’s also likely that person-to-person the spread will continue to occur, including in the United States.

CDC Response:
CDC is closely monitoring this situation and is working with WHO and state and local public health partners to respond to this emerging public health threat.
The goal of the ongoing U.S. public health response is to prevent the sustained spread of COVID-19 in this country.

CDC established a COVID-19 Incident Management Structure on January 7, 2020. On January 21, 2020, CDC activated its Emergency Operations Center to better provides ongoing support to the COVID-19 response.

On January 27, 2020, CDC issued updated travel guidance for China, recommending that travelers avoid all nonessential travel to all of the country (Level 3 Travel Health Notice).

CDC and Customs and Border Protection (CBP) are continuing to conduct enhanced entry screening of passengers who have been in Wuhan within the past 14 days at 5 designated U.S. airports. Given travel out of Wuhan has been shut down, the number of passengers who meet these criteria is dwindling.

Going forward, CBP officials will monitor for travelers with symptoms compatible with COVID-19 infection and a travel connection with China and will refer them to CDC staff for evaluation at all 20 U.S. quarantine stations.

At the same time, ALL travelers from China will be given CDC’s Travel Health Alert Notice, educating those travelers about what to do if they get sick with certain symptoms within 14 days after arriving in the United States.

On January 31, 2020, the White House 2019 Novel Coronavirus Task Force held a press conference to announce the implementation of new travel policies to be effective at 5:00 p.m. eastern standard time on February 2, 2020. See “Proclamation on Suspension of Entry as Immigrants and Nonimmigrants of Persons who Pose a Risk of Transmitting 2019 Novel Coronavirusexternal icon”.
CDC issued an updated interim Health Alert Notice (HAN) Advisory to inform state and local health departments and health care providers about this outbreak on February 1, 2020.

On January 30, 2020, CDC published guidance for healthcare providers on the clinical care of COVID-19 patients.

CDC has deployed multidisciplinary teams to Washington, Illinois, California, and Arizona to assist health departments with clinical management, contact tracing, and communications.

CDC has developed a real-time Reverse transcription-polymerase Chain Reaction (RRT-PCR) test that can diagnose COVID-19 in respiratory and serum samples from clinical specimens. On January 24, 2020, CDC publicly posted the assay protocol for this test. Currently, testing for this virus must take place at CDC, but in the coming days and weeks, CDC will share these tests with domestic and international partners through the agency’s International Reagent Resourceexternal icon.

CDC uploaded the entire genome of the virus from all five reported cases in the United States to GenBank.

CDC also is growing the virus in cell culture, which is necessary for further studies, including for additional genetic characterization.

CDC Recommends:
While the immediate risk of this new virus to the American public is believed to be low at this time, everyone can do their part to help us respond to this emerging public health threat: 
For everyone: It’s currently flu and respiratory disease season, and CDC recommends getting vaccinated, taking everyday preventive actions to stop the spread of germs, and taking flu antivirals if prescribed.

For healthcare professionals:
Be on the look-out for people with travel history to China and fever and respiratory symptoms.

If you are a healthcare professional caring for a 2109-nCoV patient, please take care of yourself and follow the recommended infection control procedures.
For people who may have COVID-19 infection: Please follow CDC guidance on how to reduce the risk of spreading your illness to others.

For travelers: Stay up to date with CDC’s travel health notices related to this outbreak.

Other Available Resources:
The following resources are available with information on COVID-19
CDC Travelers’ Health: Novel Coronavirus in China
CDC Health Alert Network Advisory Update and Interim Guidance on Outbreak of 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19)
CDC Health Alert Network Advisory Update and Interim Guidance on Outbreak of 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) in Wuhan, China
CDC Health Alert Network Advisory information for state and local health departments and health care providers
CDC Information on Coronaviruses
World Health Organization, Coronavirusexternal icon

More information on the patient who was released into the #SanAntonio community by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and then brought back into isolation after a “weakly positive” test result for COVID-19. @SAMetroHealth #SATX pic.twitter.com/mGBo7hrISx

— City of San Antonio (@COSAGOV) March 2, 2020





Age, Sex, Existing Conditions of COVID-19 Cases and Deaths

Last updated: February 29, 4:40 GMT
There are two sources that provide age, sex, and comorbidity statistics:
  • The Report of the WHO-China Joint Mission published on Feb. 28 by WHO, [2] which is based on 55,924 laboratory-confirmed cases. The report notes that "The Joint Mission acknowledges the known challenges and biases of reporting crude CFR early in an epidemic" (see also our discussion on; How to calculate the mortality rate during an outbreak)
  • A paper by the Chinese CCDC released on Feb. 17, which is based on 72,314 confirmed, suspected, and asymptomatic cases of COVID-19 in China as of Feb. 11, and was published in the Chinese Journal of Epidemiology [1]
We will list data from both, labeling them as "confirmed cases" and "all cases" respectively in the tables.

Age of Coronavirus Deaths

COVID-19 Fatality Rate by AGE:

*Death Rate = (number of deaths / number of cases) = probability of dying if infected by the virus (%). This probability differs depending on the age group. The percentages shown below do not have to add up to 100%, as they do NOT represent the share of deaths by age group. Rather, it represents, for a person in a given age group, the risk of dying if infected with COVID-19.
AGE
DEATH RATE
confirmed cases
DEATH RATE
all cases
80+ years old
21.9%
14.8%
70-79 years old

8.0%
60-69 years old

3.6%
50-59 years old

1.3%
40-49 years old

0.4%
30-39 years old

0.2%
20-29 years old

0.2%
10-19 years old

0.2%
0-9 years old
no fatalities



*Death Rate = (number of deaths/number of cases) = probability of dying if infected by the virus (%). The percentages do not have to add up to 100%, as they do NOT represent the share of deaths by age group.
In general, relatively few cases are seen among children.

Sex ratio

COVID-19 Fatality Rate by SEX:

*Death Rate = (number of deaths / number of cases) = probability of dying if infected by the virus (%). This probability differs depending on sex. When reading these numbers, it must be taken into account that smoking in China is much more prevalent among males. Smoking increases the risks of respiratory complications.
SEX
DEATH RATE
confirmed cases
DEATH RATE
all cases
Male
4.7%
2.8%
Female
2.8%
1.7%
*Death Rate = (number of deaths/number of cases) = probability of dying if infected by the virus (%). The percentages do not have to add up to 100%, as they do NOT represent the share of deaths by sex.

Pre-existing medical conditions (comorbidities)

Patients who reported no pre-existing ("comorbid") medical conditions had a case fatality rate of 0.9%. Pre-existing illnesses that put patients at higher risk of dying from a COVID-19 infection are:

COVID-19 Fatality Rate by COMORBIDITY:

*Death Rate = (number of deaths / number of cases) = probability of dying if infected by the virus (%). This probability differs depending on a pre-existing condition. The percentage shown below does NOT represent in any way the share of deaths by pre-existing conditions. Rather, it represents, for a patient with a given pre-existing condition, the risk of dying if infected by COVID-19.
PRE-EXISTING CONDITION
DEATH RATE
confirmed cases
DEATH RATE
all cases
Cardiovascular disease
13.2%
10.5%
Diabetes
9.2%
7.3%
Chronic respiratory disease
8.0%
6.3%
Hypertension
8.4%
6.0%
Cancer
7.6%
5.6%
no pre-existing conditions

0.9%
*Death Rate = (number of deaths / number of cases) = probability of dying if infected by the virus (%). The percentages do not have to add up to 100%, as they do NOT represent the share of deaths by the condition.

Novel Coronavirus Worldometer Sections:

Sources

  1. Report of the WHO-China Joint Mission on Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) [Pdf] - World Health Organization, Feb. 28, 2020


FBIS Blog Visits

Blog Archive

Popular Posts

Google Analytics