Hyoscine-hydrobromide – Scopolamine (Deliriants) – associated medical uses – misuses


MS13-MS18-11Hyoscine hydrobromide, also known as scopolamine hydrobromide,[2] is a medication used in the treatment of motion sickness and postoperative nausea and vomiting.[3][4] One common side effect is drowsiness.[5] 

Scopolamine is a tropane alkaloid drug that acts as a competitive antagonist at muscarinic acetylcholine receptors; it is thus classified as an anticholinergic, antimuscarinic drug. Although it is usually referred to as a nonspecific antagonist,[6] there is indirect evidence for m1-receptor subtype specificity.[7] 

It is on the World Health Organization’s List of Essential Medicines, the most important medications needed in a basic health system.[8] Scopolamine is among the secondary metabolites produced by the Solanaceae (nightshade) family of plants.[9] The name “scopolamine” is derived from the plant genus Scopolia.[10] “Hyoscine” is from the scientific name for henbane, Hyoscyamus niger.[11] 










 

Scopolamine Hydrobromide

Pronunciation

Class: Antimuscarinics/Antispasmodics
VA Class: AU350
CAS Number: 51-34-3
Brands: Scopace, Transderm Scop

Introduction

Antimuscarinic; naturally occurring tertiary amine.a

Uses for Scopolamine Hydrobromide

Motion Sickness

Prevention of motion-induced nausea and vomiting; considered most effective drug for this use.a

Oral or IM administration usually reserved for patients exposed to short periods of intense motion or those highly susceptible to motion because these routes have short duration of effect and high incidence of adverse effects.a

Transdermal administration is effective and has fewer adverse effects and increased duration compared with oral administration.a

Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting

Used transdermally for prevention of nausea and vomiting associated with recovery from anesthesia and surgery, but efficacy is equivocal.112 114 115 116 117 118

Surgery

Has been used preoperatively to inhibit salivation and excessive respiratory tract secretions, but use of general anesthetics (e.g., thiopental [no longer commercially available in the US], halothane) that do not stimulate secretions has reduced the need for this use.a

Used preoperatively and in obstetrics in conjunction with analgesics or sedatives to produce tranquilization and amnesia; however, benzodiazepines may be preferred.a

Has greater sedative, antisecretory (e.g., on respiratory secretions), and antiemetic effects than atropine;a however, less effective than atropine in preventing intraoperative cholinergic effects (e.g., cardiac arrhythmias, hypotension, bradycardia).

Parkinsonian Syndrome

Has been used for symptomatic treatment of parkinsonian syndrome; however, antimuscarinincs generally have been replaced with dopaminergic drugs.d

 

[WikiPedia..com – Referances ]::
Hyoscine hydrobromide, also known as scopolamine hydrobromide,[2] is a medication used in the treatment of motion sickness and postoperative nausea and vomiting.[3][4]
One common side effect is drowsiness.[5] Scopolamine is a tropane alkaloid drug that acts as a competitive antagonist at muscarinic acetylcholine receptors; it is thus classified as an anticholinergic, antimuscarinic drug. Although it is usually referred to as a nonspecific antagonist,[6] there is indirect evidence for m1-receptor subtype specificity.[7] It is on the World Health Organization’s List of Essential Medicines, the most important medications needed in a basic health system.[8] Scopolamine is named after the plant genus Scopolia.[9] The name “hyoscine” is from the scientific name for henbane, Hyoscyamus niger.[10]

Medical use:

Scopolamine has a number of uses in medicine, where it is used to treat the following:[11][12]

It is sometimes used as a premedication (especially to reduce respiratory tract secretions) to surgery, mostly commonly by injection.[11][12]

 

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